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dc.contributor.authorLöfgren, Niklas
dc.contributor.authorConradsson, David
dc.contributor.authorRennie, Linda
dc.contributor.authorMoe-Nilssen, Rolf
dc.contributor.authorFranzén, Erika
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-25T13:18:34Z
dc.date.available2019-06-25T13:18:34Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationLöfgren, N., Conradsson, D., Rennie, L., Moe-Nilssen, R., & Franzén, E. (2019). The effects of integrated single- and dual-task training on automaticity and attention allocation in Parkinson’s disease: A secondary analysis from a randomized trial. Neuropsychology, 33(2), 147-156.nb_NO
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2602172
dc.description.abstractObjective: People with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD) demonstrate impaired automaticity of motor and cognitive tasks, with unclear prioritization strategies when exposed to dual-task situations. However, no randomized trials have investigated the effects of training on automaticity and prioritization strategies in this population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training on the automaticity of gait and cognitive processing in PwPD and the allocation of attention between gait and a cognitive task. Method: One-hundred PwPD were randomized to 10 weeks of challenging gait and balance training (including single and dual-task conditions) or to a control group (care as usual). Outcome measure was the absolute dual-task interference (difference between single- and dual-tasks) for gait and cognitive parameters. Differences between baseline and follow-up were compared between the groups. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to assess potential differences. Significance level was set to p = .05. The direction and magnitude of nonparametric effect sizes were used to investigate attention allocation. Results: No significant between-groups differences were found regarding any gait parameter. The training group significantly improved the dual-task interference of the cognitive task. The direction of between-groups effect sizes indicated that the training group primarily allocated attention to the cognitive task, whereas the control group appeared to prioritize gait. Conclusions: The results indicate that challenging training can improve automaticity of cognitive processing during walking. This may have a beneficiary effect on the ability to ambulate safely in the community, thereby improving independence and the quality of life in this population.nb_NO
dc.publisherNeuropsychologynb_NO
dc.subjectneurodegenerativenb_NO
dc.subjectexecutive functionnb_NO
dc.subjectattentionnb_NO
dc.subjectrehabilitationnb_NO
dc.subjectgait impairmentnb_NO
dc.titleThe Effects of Integrated Single- and Dual-Task Training on Automaticity and Attention Allocation in Parkinson’s Disease: A Secondary Analysis From a Randomized Trialnb_NO
dc.typeJournal articlenb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber147-156nb_NO
dc.source.volume33nb_NO
dc.source.journalNeuropsychologynb_NO
dc.source.issue2nb_NO
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/neu0000496


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